Anyone implementing apprenticeships with private sector as substitute for "trainings"?

Reply on DGroups | 12 comments

06 Mar 2019, 2:39 p.m.

Steev Lynn

I'm really glad you brought up this topic. We've been providing TVET
directly, in-house, which naturally limits the diversity of our
offerings. I had already been thinking about broadening the vocational
options we offer by going through private sector trainers and employers,
everything from for-profit computer training schools to per diem support
to attend government vo-tech programs, to subsidized apprenticeships in
the construction, hospitality, electronics, food processing, and other
sectors. I've appreciated the comments from people who have done such
things in the past.
-Steev

> Wow, thanks everyone! That was more feedback than I expected, not a bad>
thing at all 😊
> All the links and projects referenced gives me a really good place to
> start. I will speak with my colleague and likely get back to some of
you
> with more questions.
> Much appreciated!
>
>

05 Mar 2019, 2:49 p.m.

[Hidden email]

Wow, thanks everyone! That was more feedback than I expected, not a bad thing at all 😊
All the links and projects referenced gives me a really good place to start. I will speak with my colleague and likely get back to some of you with more questions.
Much appreciated!

05 Mar 2019, 2:48 p.m.

Mary Khozomba

Dear all
The Norwegian Refugee Council's education core competency has such a program for the youth. I have copied here Therese Curran and Amos to contribute to this topic. 
Regards 
Mary Khozomba 

Sent from Yahoo Mail on Android

On Mon, 4 Mar 2019 at 17:31, bounce@mailer1.33mail.com<bounce@mailer1.33mail.com<div class="original_message_link">Original message
> wrote: Hi All,
First I wanted to thank everyone that responded to my post ('Development Organizations that "specialize" in the "behavioral economic tendencies"?' a few months ago), I was re-reviewing them and many of those responses were really really helpful.

Anyway, I recently was listening to a piece about Germany and how the government essentially works with the private sector to support apprenticeships, or something like that. I also just finished observing the (questionable) results of yet another field training and it occurred to me that I have not seen any interventions that work with the private sector to promote apprenticeships with youth?

While not directly "market development", to my way of thinking, it would involve the markets/private sector and potentially be more sustainable. I have been thinking about things such as paying down the risk (salary) for a business/craftsman to take on an apprentice and giving people, I'm thinking specifically youth, some real-world training/experience - but I haven’t found anything like this in the development context?

Is anyone aware of any literature surrounding development/developing economies and apprenticeships?
Thanks!
-Rob

04 Mar 2019, 5:57 p.m.

Karla Yoder

Thanks for the shout-out, Scott. Indeed, our YIEDIE program in Ghana uses apprenticeships as the training method to assist youth finding opportunities in the construction sector. We work with TVET organizations that develop relationships/MOUs with master craftspeople that run a workshop and take on apprentices. We’ve done follow-up to see the extent to which the youth continue to work with the master on his “gang” after the training period is finished. I don’t have any formal studies to share right now but would be happy to connect directly for more information.

Karla Yoder
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04 Mar 2019, 5:56 p.m.

Sarah J Ward

Hi Rob (and Scott and everyone),

I think there is a quite a bit of work in this area right now, even more so as market systems work advances. VTECT and job-readiness programs, as well as livelihoods projects are trying to forge the right kinds of partnerships with private sector companies to help promote job creation and readiness.
We just did a workshop with Global Communities, a MERS Mainstreaming partner, and looked at a really relevant project called DREAMS in Kenya where they are doing just that. There should be an interesting case study out now...check on the MERS website www.mershandbook.org/resources.
There is a long tradition for apprenticeships with both MSMEs for training and job placement in development and recovery contexts and I would be happy to provide more examples and literature reviews. Also, IRC and other partners are working on these kinds of projects in the MENA region right now as well, led by Labor Market Analysis tools like the LMA and the CLARA.

Hope this helps,
Sarah

Sarah J Ward
Livelihoods and Economic Recovery in Crisis
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04 Mar 2019, 5:56 p.m.

[Hidden email]

Switzerland has the same type of dual system as Germany. At Swisscontact we have numerous projects promoting apprenticeships. Please check out the projects on the website... Ailsa
________________________________

04 Mar 2019, 5:54 p.m.

Samia Qumri

While working with UNICEF-Jordan I was Emergency youth Officer overseeing
and managing youth programmes in the camps for the Syrian refugees
implemented by NRC providing skills development/vocational training to
foster the livelihoods, also partnering with the private sector to hold
bootcamps and train the youth on apprenticeship in order to prepare them
for job placement. Jordan is currently both in the urban and camps is
investing in this sector and there's lot you can check through UNHCR portal
, ILO pages and by googling.

Also I can assist with further info if you need
Best,

*Samia Qumri (Ms)*
*a:* PO Box 815424 Amman | JORDAN

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On Mon, Mar 4, 2019 at 4:33 PM [Hidden email] <
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04 Mar 2019, 4:45 p.m.

Rose Wilder

Dear Michael,

Might you share more about the intervention mentioned in Kyaka II R/S?

Best,

Rose

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04 Mar 2019, 4:38 p.m.

Aleksandra Lasota-Barańska

I used to do in the stabilization context of Iraq. After the
apprenticeship, beneficiaries would receive a start-up toolkit.
Interestingly, we figured out that after the training some of the bnfs used
their toolkits to join their “master/teacher ” and expand the existing
business.

In terms of the methodology, first, we would do market assessment and
identify potential service providers(small craftsmen and other businesses)
then we would select bnfs and assess their skills and professional
aspirations. After this, our case managers matched trainees (apprentices)
with masters who hired them for 3 months. We would contribute towards the
payment. At the end, bnf received a start-up toolkit and business
counseling (either employability or entrepreneurship advice).

Feel free to reach out to me individually, if you need more info.
Aleks

On Mon, 4 Mar 2019 at 16:30, [Hidden email] <
[Hidden email]

04 Mar 2019, 3:38 p.m.

Scott Merrill

I heard about a project being implemented by Global Communities in Ghana
that was doing something similar to what you describe with apprenticeships
in the construction sector. I haven't seen anything published about it, but
a quick google search did surface a description of the project:
https://www.globalcommunitiesgh.org/index.php/what-we-do/yiedie It may
worth reaching out to them for more information.

Scott

04 Mar 2019, 3:10 p.m.

Michael Komakech

Thanks for that
We have been implementing & still on same approach of placing youths to
local owners businesses for specified period of time agreed(Approximately
six months). In this approach, We aims at two objectives; Youth acquires
the apprenticeship skill and support the business growth(provide business
grants) also.
If it suits your interest, then we can share more

Regards,
Komakech Michael
Livelihoods Officer-Kyaka II R/S

On Mon, Mar 4, 2019 at 5:30 PM [Hidden email] <
[Hidden email]

04 Mar 2019, 2:29 p.m.

[Hidden email]

Hi All,
First I wanted to thank everyone that responded to my post ('Development Organizations that "specialize" in the "behavioral economic tendencies"?' a few months ago), I was re-reviewing them and many of those responses were really really helpful.

Anyway, I recently was listening to a piece about Germany and how the government essentially works with the private sector to support apprenticeships, or something like that. I also just finished observing the (questionable) results of yet another field training and it occurred to me that I have not seen any interventions that work with the private sector to promote apprenticeships with youth?

While not directly "market development", to my way of thinking, it would involve the markets/private sector and potentially be more sustainable. I have been thinking about things such as paying down the risk (salary) for a business/craftsman to take on an apprentice and giving people, I'm thinking specifically youth, some real-world training/experience - but I haven’t found anything like this in the development context?

Is anyone aware of any literature surrounding development/developing economies and apprenticeships?
Thanks!
-Rob