Markets and Covid19

Reply on DGroups | 22 comments

30 Mar 2020, 9:29 p.m.

Dan Norell

Hi Markets in Crisis colleagues,

In our Bangladesh Nobo Jatra program led by World Vision, our Winrock International agriculture and alternative livelihoods staff have reported that village agents that the project has trained are delivering to the farm gate seeds, other agriculture inputs, and alternative livelihood inputs such as paper products to market paper boxes. This allows for producers to stay in their home.

We have developed some materials on village agents.

Below are some resources:

* Village Agents (pages 45-55) in the 4th edition of the “Integrating Extremely Poor Producers into Markets Field Guide.” https://www.agrilinks.org/post/integrating-extremely-poor-producers-markets-field-guide-fourth-edition
* Working with the private sector. See pages 12-24x. “Village Agent Guide: Strengthening Business Linkages for Smallholder Farmers.” https://www.agrilinks.org/post/village-agent-guide-strengthening-business-linkages-smallholder-farmers
* “Better together: improving food security and nutrition by linking market and food systems” recently published journal article - https://www.developmentbookshelf.com/doi/abs/10.3362/1755-1986.19-00008

Abstract
Market-based approaches to food security often increase agricultural productivity and income yet sometimes fail to enhance nutrition. When food security programming combines market and food systems with a specific focus on women and girls, economic and nutrition outcomes benefit. We identify distinctive and shared elements from market and food systems and highlight how they enhance nutrition outcomes when they are combined. We describe food security programming by CARE and World Vision in Bangladesh, Ethiopia, Madagascar, Zambia, and Zimbabwe, demonstrating nutrition gains in food insecure households.

All the best in this very difficult time!

Warm regards,

Dan

Dan Norell
Senior Technical Advisor, Economic Development
Food Security & Livelihoods Team, Resource Development and Management Department
International Programs Group, World Vision US
Phone 202.572.6328 : Fax 202.572.6480 : Email – [Hidden email] <mailto:[Hidden email]> : Skype - dnorell
300 I Street NE Washington, DC 20002 USA

WE BELIEVE IN CHILDREN
www.WorldVision.org <http: www.worldvision.org=""/>
World Vision is a Christian humanitarian organization dedicated to working with children, families, and their communities worldwide to reach their full potential by tackling the causes of poverty and injustice.

30 Mar 2020, 12:32 p.m.

Samia Qumri

Hello to All trusting you and your families are staying home and safe
Following this insightful MiCers group

I'm sharing below links to recent measures being implemented+ some still
being cooked to tackle the impact on Jordanian economy/labour market
amid Covid19 with focus on the vulnerable host plus the refugee/ migrant
community;

hope it kicks some thoughts/ideas here
https://www.ilo.org/beirut/media-centre/fs/WCMS_739838/lang--en/index.htm
http://www.jordantimes.com/news/local/kingdom-needs-%E2%80%98urgent-strategy%E2%80%99-assist-private-sector-face-covid-19-losses

Stay well

*Samia Qumri (Ms)*
*a:* PO Box 815424 Amman | JORDAN

*t:* +962 (0)795600356 * e: [Hidden email] * Skype: *squmri78

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27 Mar 2020, 12:14 p.m.

Sarah J Ward

Hi Karri, Sarish, Alison, Simon, Alfred et al…

Hello from New York, recently in the COVID19 news cycle 😊, perhaps you heard?….I am just starting to think about how the universal and non-geographic reach of the economic impact from COVID19 will be.

On a personal level, My husband had to shut down his used car business, as the NY department of motor vehicle shut and all NY non-essential business shut. Then the ports, the transport of his used cars, the shipping agencies he uses to ship them to Africa, the African businesses that resell them, the financial systems that move the money…all of that is fully interrupted right now. This is just my little family…imagine the huge number - many nations of people - all with the same experience at the same time, right now…

And in I places I usually work in the global south (and could not even get to if I were to try and “respond - which opens this whole other thought around this pandemic really truly supporting local expertise and solutions to the emergency) have on-going complex emergencies: both in the immediate term (social distancing in a refugee camp? Really?) and in the longer term: international supermarket chains, supply chains that end in the west or Europe, the international financial service hubs and systems that effect structures all the way down to the village market level, huge swaths of borders closed to trade across entire continents…

And while I know (?) it’s not likely a global Armageddon, it does feel hard to predict what will be the fallout. There are disasters I have dealt with (wars, earthquakes, floods, droughts…) most of which are geographically bound in some capacity…and then there is this…

I have reattached the Minimum Economic Recovery Standards (MERS) COVID19 guidance for those who are responding now…and let me know what are the mounting challenges and how response in the markets moves where you are…I can’t leave the house…

Rock on,

Sarah

Sarah J Ward

Livelihoods and Economic Recovery in Crisis

<mailto:[Hidden email]> [Hidden email]

skype: sarahjward

+1 518 929 6975

LinkedIn: <https: www.linkedin.com="" in="" sarah-ward-5280196=""> https://www.linkedin.com/in/sarah-ward-5280196

26 Mar 2020, 2:35 p.m.

[Hidden email]

Love those stories of adaptation Sarish!
I think we could be a real service to MSMEs if we could share more stories
of adaptation with each other and with them. Everyone likes a good idea...
but not every idea works in every context.

Any one else have stories to share of how businesses in your areas are
adapting/preparing/responding to COVID-19?

Karri

On Thu, Mar 26, 2020 at 11:47 AM [Hidden email] <

26 Mar 2020, 2:34 p.m.

Alfred Hamadziripi

Hi Johannes

I hear your argument. However, I foresee challenges if we discard market
solutions and value chains in our attempts to find ways to contribute in
responding to the current pandemic. Unless it is an issue of how we are
understanding and applying these. Of course in some contexts strengthening
Government institutions is definitely important (say those that deal with
regulations and enforcement of policies). Getting them involved in the
distribution of goods and services is an area tainted with significant and
repetitive failures that we will not go into to avoid digression. I believe
we need to look at market solutions and value chains as being about active
engagement and action from a mix of Government, private sector, civic
groups, communities and others. Unless these work purposely together it is
for certain going to be a much bigger challenge overcoming the pandemic.

Best regards

Alfred Hamadziripi

On Thu, Mar 26, 2020 at 5:04 PM [Hidden email] via Dgroups <
[Hidden email]

26 Mar 2020, 2:31 p.m.

Simon Levine

Hi Johannes,

It is probably true that most people on this group are not radical free-marketeers and I expect that many, if not most, of us have been and will continue to be very critical of an overly laissez-faire or neo-liberal approach to economic management in our own countries.

It is also true that the old soviet central planning mentality probably only exists in one place (with the possible exception of North Korea?) and that is in the aid sector, especially the humanitarian sector. Many agencies still have a default tendency to assume that they can work out what the final situation ought to be and then try to plan to deliver it. (Think of all those in-kind distributions we make, how we categorise everyone, all the local planning that we facipulate, because we know what it ought to look like really!)

Having said that…. If the Government of Uganda were to attempt to determine everyone’s needs, to design a system to deliver those needs and then to manage that system, I have a very good idea what the outcomes would be. They would be hugely successful – in terms of the personal wealth of those designing and manging the system. (You must have heard the Ugandan expression that ‘there is no conflict of interest between my pocket and my being in charge of all the money - it’s an identity of interest!’) It is rare that I am 100% convinced of anything, but here is one exception: given a choice between trusting local traders and market forces or trusting a centralised planning process by the Government of Uganda, I’m going for the market forces.

Of course, we don’t have to go for either extreme, and I think our critical role right now, as it is every day, is to understand where and how market forces are not working in the interests of the poor and to see what can be done to change those outcomes.

A luta continua!

Simon

26 Mar 2020, 2:24 p.m.

Alfred Hamadziripi

Aside of integrating COVID-19 awareness and prevention activities in
voucher programs, an observation in the context of some parts in Yemen
points on the need to focus on the whole supply chain (formal and
informal). Addressing needs at the market centres alone will not
necessarily be adequate, especially in some complex & conflict vulnerable
systems. For example, there are some goods that are and may, for some-time,
continue to be moved from one part to the other/imported. The COVID-19
related risks along the supply chain will need to be understood and
responded to with different forms of support that enable movement,
confidence, access and with safety. Even in this early phase I have
observed that engaging and exploring the role of some key Government
structures (despite all the challenges/issues they have) and private sector
actors will be critical in enabling implementation, particularly overcoming
some of the humanitarian access issues. For example on two occasions
engaging the authorities to understand the integration of COVID in program
activities enabled waivers to be granted on implementation.

Best regards

Alfred Hamadziripi

On Thu, Mar 26, 2020 at 2:48 PM [Hidden email] <

26 Mar 2020, 1:29 p.m.

[Hidden email]

Dear all
Interesting article and discussion, Please remember that the CORONA virus or COVID 19 is caused because people think in market solutions. If we leave it up to individuals and the 'free market mechanisms' and value chains solutions, we will never be able to stop this disease. We need to change our thinking and step away from free market principles. Working in Uganda at the start of the pandemic, I can predict what will happen. The health crisis will be 10 x worse than in Spain or Italy. 
What we need is a drastic change in our mindset. One example I can give you is the Soviet Unions at the time of a crisis  The Soviet Union adopted a command economy  in view of the World War II, whereby production and distribution of goods were centralized and directed by the government, which involved the nationalization of strategic industry, centralized distribution of output, coercive requisition of agricultural production, and attempts to eliminate as much as possible money circulation, private enterprises and free trade. I am not saying that we have to follow this example exactly, but it helped Russia out of the crisis. So far we are getting deeper and deeper into it. 
If we leave it to free market principles like President Trump is suggesting, as well as several European countries, the crisis will get worse. 
Sincerely 

Johannes Schot

Team LeaderStrengthening Governance and Civil Society Programme – Training of CSO StaffMembers and Advice to GIZ Advisers

 

NIRAS - IP ConsultGmbH

 

The Cube, plot5/7, Cooper Road (opposite Acacia Mall)

2nd Floor

Kampala, Uganda

Mobile: +256 (0)775.752.416
Skype:johannesreinier

scho@ip-consult.de
www.ip-consult.de
 

Geschäftsführer /Managing Director:
Wolfgang Haag

AmtsgerichtStuttgart HRB 8452 /
Local Court:Stuttgart Reg. N° HRB 8452

____________________________________________

On Thursday, March 26, 2020, 02:50:41 PM GMT+3, Naziha EL MOUSSAOUI <[Hidden email]<div class="original_message_link">Original message
> wrote:


The following attachments were removed from this message and stored in the library:

Tous Unis Vers Elles-BurkinaFaso.png (0,1MB)

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Dear group

I wanted just to share this photo taken in Burkina Faso and shared on Facebook by the association “Tous Unis Vers Elles”.

It shows how a women has put in place some  Covid-19  prevention measures to protect her small business  which is her only source of incomes. 

 

Naziha EL MOUSSAOUI

British Red Cross

Food security, nutrition and livelihoods adviser

Mobile/ whatsapp : +44.771.137.69.79 or  +33.617.033.541

Skype: nazihaelmoussaoui

 

 

 

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From: [Hidden email] <[Hidden email]>On Behalf Of Alison Hemberger
Sent: 25 March 2020 20:37
To: Markets in Crises <[Hidden email]>
Subject: [mic] Markets and Covid19

 

Hi all,

 

I'm appreciating this rich and important discussion. I know I'm contemplating how to best respond to this unique crisis as well, and usingMC's Markets in Crisis framework as one lens for approaches to coping and recovery. 

 

One thing I've been trying to remember is that for many of the populations we serve, Covid-19 is one of many risks they face, and maybe not even the top risk. Even in the midst of this pandemic, other health risks, conflict risks, and/or economic insecurity are critical. As Simon noted, finding ways to inspire confidence in markets is really important, as is making sure policy makers have access to information on the local economic and food security impacts of the crisis in addition to critical public health information. It's also worth remembering that just as sharply as restrictions have been rolled out, they can also be retracted, leaving financially-strapped economic networks, but not the typical physical destruction that we see in other types of crises. I think our MiC community has a big role to play in preparing the aid community for this type of sharp transition in market functionality. 

 

Alison

 

ALISON HEMBERGER
Team Lead | Markets 

Technical Support Unit

MERCY CORPS
skype alison.hemberger
1111 19th Street NW, Suite 650 | Washington, DC 20036

 

 

On Wed, Mar 25, 2020 at 10:23 AM Emily Sloane <[Hidden email]> wrote:

Hi Corrie,

 

Thanks for starting this incredibly timely discussion. So many possible avenues for discussion.

 

To be honest I think this is very new territory for us as markets practitioners, simply because of the scale and reach of this crisis. In the past we have tended to focus on “crisis-affected markets” in a specific country or region, but in such cases there are normally well-functioning supply markets farther up the chain (and as we know, even crisis-affected markets tend to function pretty well!). In the current situation, the entire world is affected, and as such the penultimate suppliers for certain key goods may no longer be functioning at full capacity, if at all, not to mention the fact that border closures/trade restrictions may make it difficult or impossible to access supplies that are still available. Not to mention that the very basics of market interactions at an individual market place are affected, since every person-to-person sale poses the risk of propagating this disease. I’d say even before this crisis we as a community of practice were still very much in a learning phase re: what constitutes best practice in market-based programming, and now we are in uncharted territory. That being said, some initial reflections re: your first two questions below.

 

- What measures are being taken in our humanitarian/development market-based programmes to adapt to and prepare for the spread of Covid19?


- At IRC we are still figuring out our guidance on how to adapt programs. For basic needs cash/voucher programs we are considering much of theguidance that has already been shared via the CaLP listserv such as frontloading/collapsing distributions and modifying distribution protocols to enforce social distancing, handwashing etc. For more livelihoods-oriented programs this is more of a work in progress but we are recognizing that we may be putting people at risk/setting them up for failure if we carry on with business start-up support as planned and are looking to suspend such programming and/or shift it to basic needs support until the pandemic eases. Certainly there also seems to be space to advocate for and possibly even support the function of critical market systems (bearing in mind that in this case, critical markets include not only food and other typical household necessities but also key WASH and Health items such as disinfectant, protective masks and even hospital equipment like ventilators).

- Any tips or advice for working with traders/FSPs and allowing market exchange to take place in a safe way ?


- Again I think we are still grappling with this (and clearly haven’t mastered this in the US and Europe), and this will require the implication of and leadership from local authorities to really be impactful. There is only so much we can control as humanitarians – such as managing the risk of infection during cash distributions. Here again the idea of getting ahead of the virus by frontloading distributions so that vulnerable people can stock up on essentials before the virus takes hold may make sense in some places – combined with heavy sensitization about the virus’ transmission and prevention. Those NGOs who have technical expertise in health and WASH could also partner with local health and other authorities to conduct sensitization via local market management committees, radio stations etc, in an effort to broaden awareness. WASH actors could also consider rehabilitating/installing enhanced hygiene and sanitation facilities in local market places AND in communities. Just a few ideas to get us thinking, but I’m sure there are many more out there!

- Any opportunities for collaboration and sharing of learning?

 

Emily

 

From:[Hidden email] [mailto:marketsincrises@dgroups.org]On Behalf Of Parvin Ngala
Sent: Saturday, March 21, 2020 7:13 PM
To: Markets in Crises <[Hidden email]>
Subject: [mic] Markets and Covid19

 

Hi Corrie! I was thinking about how this pandemic has emphasized the need for building local market capacities for preparedness and response. More so because movement of people and goods restricted. There are some interesting ideas coming up in Kenya on private sector engagement in facilitating access to critical goods e.g brewery companies being asked to support production of sanitizers; reduction in costs for certain products; supply to high risk areas. 

 

Since most of these are in the pipeline (now that the Eastern Africa region is just a week into the initial cases), I’m on the lookout to see how our countries (and markets fair). Looking to hear stories from other regions.

 

Regards 

 

 

Parvin Ngala I Regional Water, Sanitation and Hygiene Advisor I Horn, East and Central Africa

Oxfam International

3rd Floor, The Atrium, Chaka Road

P. O. Box 40860-00100 I Nairobi, Kenya I

Tel: (020) 2821116, Office Mobile: +254780930096

Email: Parvin.Ngala@oxfam.org I Skype: parvin.ngala

From:[Hidden email] <[Hidden email]> on behalf of Corrie Sissons <[Hidden email]>
Sent: 20 March 2020 22:15
To: Markets in Crises <[Hidden email]>
Subject: [mic] Markets and Covid19

 

Hi MiCers,

 

It seems like it’s been a while since we’ve had much discussion on here!  As we are (I’m sure) all watching the spread of Covid19 I cant help but wonder what sort of market based preparedness and response work agencies are engaging in, especially given the social distancing, shop closures and travel restrictions which many countries are now under – and will likely widen to include others.

 

- What measures are being taken in our humanitarian/development market-based programmes to adapt to and prepare for the spread of Covid19?
- Any tips or advice for working with traders/FSPs and allowing market exchange to take place in a safe way ?
- Any opportunities for collaboration and sharing of learning?

 

I think there are some obvious lessons to be learned from the Ebola response in West Africa, however this crisis is notably different so am curious what the community is already doing / planning……..

 

Over to you all!

 

Corrie

 

Corrie Sissons

Technical Advisor – Cash and Markets | Humanitarian Response Department | Catholic Relief Services (CRS)

Email: corrie.sissons@crs.org | Skype: corriesissons

Mobile (UK): + 44 7729629852
 


 

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26 Mar 2020, 11:47 a.m.

Naziha EL MOUSSAOUI

Dear group
I wanted just to share this photo taken in Burkina Faso and shared on Facebook by the association “Tous Unis Vers Elles”.
It shows how a women has put in place some Covid-19 prevention measures to protect her small business which is her only source of incomes.

Naziha EL MOUSSAOUI
British Red Cross
Food security, nutrition and livelihoods adviser
Mobile/ whatsapp : +44.771.137.69.79 or +33.617.033.541
Skype: nazihaelmoussaoui

26 Mar 2020, 11:46 a.m.

[Hidden email]

Dear All,
I appreciate the discussion and conversation going on. One of the things to point out is that also markets/traders are also trying to adapt as the situation unfolds even without the humanitarian interventions.
Afew examples of this adaptation I have seen in the last few days include;

* Mobile telephone company providing financial service being flexible and adapting their rules to support trading and cash transfers in the face of Covid -19. For example increasing the limit for telephone mobile money transfers without any charge to allow more use of this instead of cash, increasing daily limits of cash transactions though mobile and amount one can hold in their telephone mobile wallets. This is especially important in Africa where most people dont necessarily transact through internet banking but rather through Mpesa (using telephone line providers)
* Its interesting to see that even the very small traders (who transact on temporary sheds) have adapted measures for safety rapidly - by ensuring they have handwashing facilicilities with soap (of course in big retail outlest its done) so that people buying food and other supplies supplies are able to use this.

While as humanitarians, I think its a time to critically think of how at this time to support more use of ecash/mobile money transfers/bank transfers as opposed to provision of food items. Of course the question would be also how to we adapt where we are working inthe contexts where we have to give other types of emergency support in terms of shelter/NFI which are not readily available in the markets in addition to cash something we are still grappling with, due to health and safety concerns.

Happy to hear from others as they adapt to the situation.

Sarish Hiribae

RRM Consortium Coordinator

ACTION CONTRE LA FAIM - Yemen Mission

Mobile and Telegram: (+253) 77 552861

Email: [Hidden email] <mailto:[Hidden email]>

Skype: sarinahiribae

www.actioncontrelafaim.org <http: www.actioncontrelafaim.org=""/>

________________________________

25 Mar 2020, 7:36 p.m.

Alison Hemberger

Hi all,

I'm appreciating this rich and important discussion. I know I'm
contemplating how to best respond to this unique crisis as well, and using MC's
Markets in Crisis framework
<https: www.mercycorps.org="" research-resources="" beyond-cash-markets-crisis="">
as one lens for approaches to coping and recovery.

One thing I've been trying to remember is that for many of the populations
we serve, Covid-19 is one of many risks they face, and maybe not even the
top risk. Even in the midst of this pandemic, other health risks, conflict
risks, and/or economic insecurity are critical. As Simon noted, finding
ways to inspire confidence in markets is really important, as is making
sure policy makers have access to information on the local economic and
food security impacts of the crisis in addition to critical public health
information. It's also worth remembering that just as sharply as
restrictions have been rolled out, they can also be retracted, leaving
financially-strapped economic networks, but not the typical physical
destruction that we see in other types of crises. I think our MiC community
has a big role to play in preparing the aid community for this type of
sharp transition in market functionality.

Alison

ALISON HEMBERGER
Team Lead | Markets
Technical Support Unit

*MERCY CORPS*
skype alison.hemberger
1111 19th Street NW, Suite 650 | Washington, DC 20036

25 Mar 2020, 5:20 p.m.

Mugur Dumitrache

Not so quickly, John

Unfortunately there is more to it. I suggest you speak with your public health colleagues or Health Cluster or WHO people. In the hard-hit countries in Europe the open markets were closed. I believe it is the worse idea ever, but… maybe there are some real medical reasons behind it, and not only bad economical or political advisors...

Be well.

MUGUR DUMITRACHE
WASH Senior Expert
Technical Support Unit & Program Performance and Quality

MERCY CORPS
tel Int’l +33773661110 | fax +40317107215 | skype zevzecus
45 SW Ankeny Street | Portland OR 97204 | USA

Powered by the belief that a better world is possible.
Join us at mercycorps.org

Facebook | Twitter
____________

25 Mar 2020, 5:20 p.m.

Emily Sloane

Hi Corrie,

Thanks for starting this incredibly timely discussion. So many possible avenues for discussion.

To be honest I think this is very new territory for us as markets practitioners, simply because of the scale and reach of this crisis. In the past we have tended to focus on "crisis-affected markets" in a specific country or region, but in such cases there are normally well-functioning supply markets farther up the chain (and as we know, even crisis-affected markets tend to function pretty well!). In the current situation, the entire world is affected, and as such the penultimate suppliers for certain key goods may no longer be functioning at full capacity, if at all, not to mention the fact that border closures/trade restrictions may make it difficult or impossible to access supplies that are still available. Not to mention that the very basics of market interactions at an individual market place are affected, since every person-to-person sale poses the risk of propagating this disease. I'd say even before this crisis we as a community of practice were still very much in a learning phase re: what constitutes best practice in market-based programming, and now we are in uncharted territory. That being said, some initial reflections re: your first two questions below.

* What measures are being taken in our humanitarian/development market-based programmes to adapt to and prepare for the spread of Covid19?
* At IRC we are still figuring out our guidance on how to adapt programs. For basic needs cash/voucher programs we are considering much of the guidance <https: docs.google.com="" document="" d="" 1vk6shfds-_kvvgegcnzfxhklsmgk-vydfa09zkhwzoe="" edit=""> that has already been shared via the CaLP listserv such as frontloading/collapsing distributions and modifying distribution protocols to enforce social distancing, handwashing etc. For more livelihoods-oriented programs this is more of a work in progress but we are recognizing that we may be putting people at risk/setting them up for failure if we carry on with business start-up support as planned and are looking to suspend such programming and/or shift it to basic needs support until the pandemic eases. Certainly there also seems to be space to advocate for and possibly even support the function of critical market systems (bearing in mind that in this case, critical markets include not only food and other typical household necessities but also key WASH and Health items such as disinfectant, protective masks and even hospital equipment like ventilators).
* Any tips or advice for working with traders/FSPs and allowing market exchange to take place in a safe way ?
* Again I think we are still grappling with this (and clearly haven't mastered this in the US and Europe), and this will require the implication of and leadership from local authorities to really be impactful. There is only so much we can control as humanitarians - such as managing the risk of infection during cash distributions. Here again the idea of getting ahead of the virus by frontloading distributions so that vulnerable people can stock up on essentials before the virus takes hold may make sense in some places - combined with heavy sensitization about the virus' transmission and prevention. Those NGOs who have technical expertise in health and WASH could also partner with local health and other authorities to conduct sensitization via local market management committees, radio stations etc, in an effort to broaden awareness. WASH actors could also consider rehabilitating/installing enhanced hygiene and sanitation facilities in local market places AND in communities. Just a few ideas to get us thinking, but I'm sure there are many more out there!
* Any opportunities for collaboration and sharing of learning?

Emily

25 Mar 2020, 5:11 p.m.

Simon Levine

* Any tips or advice for working with traders/FSPs and allowing market exchange to take place in a safe way ?

Across Europe, quite a lot has been done in some places to ensure commerce is as safe as possible – and thus to inspire confidence in the market. Washing facilities; marking out metre separations between people queueing at stalls; separate opening hours for those more vulnerable to infection; use of contactless payments rather than cash; online shopping, etc etc. Many of these can be relevant – adapting contactless for mobile money in some places, and other forms of remote shopping rather than online.

Simon

Simon Levine
Senior Research Fellow

Humanitarian Policy Group
Overseas Development Institute
203 Blackfriars Road
London SE1 8NJ
United Kingdom

Tel: +44 (0)20 7922 8224
E-mail: [Hidden email] <mailto:[Hidden email]> Web: www.odi.org.uk <http: www.odi.org.uk=""/>

25 Mar 2020, 4:43 p.m.

John Hoven

One more guess: The greatest risk of infection is direct contact with
people. That could be minimized by making open-air markets wholesale only.
That keeps the informal supply chain intact from farmer to consumer, and
greatly reduces the person-to-person interaction.

25 Mar 2020, 4:34 p.m.

John Hoven

I’d like to underscore this question:

- Any tips or advice for working with traders/FSPs and allowing market
exchange to take place in a safe way ?

I did a quick internet search, saw this concern raised over and over, and
no clue how to address it — especially in informal markets.

The only guess I have is rapid development of fast, cheap COVID-19 testing
and contract tracing. That seems just barely possible. Maybe.

Any other guesses?

Are traders trying anything that might work?

John

25 Mar 2020, 3:31 p.m.

Jimena Peroni

Hi Corrie great that you kicked start the discussion in the MIC.

My personal opinion is that now more than ever the crisis can be seen
with a MBP lens and how COVID 19 regulations, measures, impact on
traders, on supply and on demand side, etc.. given the emergent crisis,
lot of the reflections are now on business continuity and keeping it
operational to protect the most vulnerable people we are already serving.
In addition, we need also to step back and reflect if business as usual
fits for purpose on this crisis, and MBP can help to analyze and respond,
specially for the impact of COVID 19 regulations and restrictions are
having in key markets. From the most pressing items such as soap, water
and medical supplies (and the engagement of private sector as Parvin
shared), to the new shaping structure that labour markets are having,
making new types of vulnerability ,such as self employed, informal
workers without government support, etc to the financial support that
traders will need to keep their business floating. And if we push beyond,
a paradigm shift from linkages between labour, access to resources and
economic security that are boosting universal basic income discussions
-leave this for another forum (+

Also this is a moment, a proliferation of global guidance are being
produced, but the impact of the crisis also is so context specific to
country regulations and political response, to the social safety net, to
labour market characteristic, to digital footprint in the banking system
and in the population, etc.. that we can try to avoid over crowding of
guidance that critical staff will not have time to read, and bringing the
thinking from countries and operations (as you rightly spurred in your
email).

I hope that at least as market practitioners, we can contribute to
leverage on the power of markets to tackle this crisis.

Best

Jimena

[IMAGE]

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

23 Mar 2020, 11:58 a.m.

CoupleJosue2011

I sûre that using money IS one if thé way if contamination if thé
sanitation policies to avoid transmission is not Care about.
It's advicable to use Electronic methode if the context is accountable.
Also, integrate in sensibilisation goods practice to avoid contamination
end integrate them in each stage is required by practionner of market
analyses.
Périple must eat , trde end shopping any way.
Previously ilve been cash transfert manager at crs mbujmayi ( ARCC3 end
CORE), SCI(ARCC2). By now, i'm VSLA spécialiste .
To carry out member's meetings for loarn end hot liquide credite is now a
challenges.

Le sam. 21 mars 2020 à 15:59, Corrie Sissons <[Hidden email]> a
écrit :

> Hi MiCers,
>
>
>
> It seems like it’s been a while since we’ve had much discussion on here!
> As we are (I’m sure) all watching the spread of Covid19 I cant help but
> wonder what sort of market based preparedness and response work agencies
> are engaging in, especially given the social distancing, shop closures and
> travel restrictions which many countries are now under – and will likely
> widen to include others.
>
>
>
> - What measures are being taken in our humanitarian/development
> market-based programmes to adapt to and prepare for the spread of Covid19?
> - Any tips or advice for working with traders/FSPs and allowing market
> exchange to take place in a safe way ?
> - Any opportunities for collaboration and sharing of learning?
>
>
>
> I think there are some obvious lessons to be learned from the Ebola
> response in West Africa, however this crisis is notably different so am
> curious what the community is already doing / planning……..
>
>
>
> Over to you all!
>
>
>
> Corrie
>
>
>
> *Corrie Sissons*
>
> Technical Advisor – Cash and Markets | Humanitarian Response Department |
> Catholic Relief Services (CRS)
>
> Email: [Hidden email] <[Hidden email]>* | Skype:
> corriesissons
>
> Mobile (UK): + 44 7729629852
>
>
>
> [image: CRS_Email_Signature_English]
>
>
>

23 Mar 2020, 11:57 a.m.

MALAKI NYAKADO

Hi Corrie

Due to nature of the transmission of COVID 19 where cash is seen as a major
transmission medium. I am thinking of doing the following at as a
preparedness mechanism to support cash program post the crisis now:

1. Opening up the e- cash system at the organizational level; the
technology, gadgets and markets capacity to accept it
2. Market support systems/ avenues. The COVID 19 is having high impact on
production capacity of the local markets, thinking ways of recovering these
production capacities will be vital
3. Stepping up the Food security sector. Empowering local food productions
at the household level to cushion against future impacts on food
availability due to COVID 19.
4. Logistics (Transport).. transport actors services may play an important
role in markets recovery.

Kind regards,
Malachi Owino
SPEDP- South Sudan

21 Mar 2020, 11:12 p.m.

Parvin Ngala

Hi Corrie! I was thinking about how this pandemic has emphasized the need for building local market capacities for preparedness and response. More so because movement of people and goods restricted. There are some interesting ideas coming up in Kenya on private sector engagement in facilitating access to critical goods e.g brewery companies being asked to support production of sanitizers; reduction in costs for certain products; supply to high risk areas.

Since most of these are in the pipeline (now that the Eastern Africa region is just a week into the initial cases), I’m on the lookout to see how our countries (and markets fair). Looking to hear stories from other regions.

Regards

Parvin Ngala I Regional Water, Sanitation and Hygiene Advisor I Horn, East and Central Africa
Oxfam International
3rd Floor, The Atrium, Chaka Road
P. O. Box 40860-00100 I Nairobi, Kenya I
Tel: (020) 2821116, Office Mobile: +254780930096
Email: [Hidden email] <mailto:[Hidden email]> I Skype: parvin.ngala
________________________________

21 Mar 2020, 3:01 p.m.

Sarah J Ward

Hi everyone,

Just throwing this out there, so much of what we do to support micro
entrepreneurs and small businesses is solidarity based (savings groups,
VSLA's, solidarity-based lending, community-based microfinance...).

We're just starting to think through what kind of guidance, long term
repercussions, and assistance we can provide to these kinds of programs
that address the need for social distancing and other key responses to
COVID19.

I can't yet offer any substantial guidance, but hopefully by the end of the
week there will be some coordinated thinking coming out...

If your organization has already thought about this and produced some
guidance in these early stages, I'd love to see it!

The long-term repercussions for open-air markets, small businesses that
depend exclusively on face-to-face business interactions, and anyone who's
ever been to the marché...😉 we will have to understand in the coming
months..

I know that the Minimum Economic Recovery Standards (MERS) will be coming
out with some guidance in collaboration with the other Sphere standards
very shortly.

Looking forward to all of your thoughts - and any early guidance for
solidarity based groups that may already be coming out of your
organizations will be most welcome!

As some of you may know, I've been working over the last year or so on the
VSLAs in crisis and conflict....and this work is continuing over the next
year as well...

Be well,
Sarah

Sarah J Ward
Livelihoods and Economic Recovery in Crisis
[Hidden email]
skype: sarahjward
+1 518 929 6975
LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/sarah-ward-5280196

20 Mar 2020, 7:14 p.m.

Corrie Sissons

Hi MiCers,

It seems like it's been a while since we've had much discussion on here! As we are (I'm sure) all watching the spread of Covid19 I cant help but wonder what sort of market based preparedness and response work agencies are engaging in, especially given the social distancing, shop closures and travel restrictions which many countries are now under - and will likely widen to include others.

* What measures are being taken in our humanitarian/development market-based programmes to adapt to and prepare for the spread of Covid19?
* Any tips or advice for working with traders/FSPs and allowing market exchange to take place in a safe way ?
* Any opportunities for collaboration and sharing of learning?

I think there are some obvious lessons to be learned from the Ebola response in West Africa, however this crisis is notably different so am curious what the community is already doing / planning........

Over to you all!

Corrie

Corrie Sissons
Technical Advisor - Cash and Markets | Humanitarian Response Department | Catholic Relief Services (CRS)
Email: [Hidden email] <mailto:[Hidden email]> | Skype: corriesissons
Mobile (UK): + 44 7729629852

[CRS_Email_Signature_English]