LIVE Markets During COVID-19 Discussion Two #CAMPMARKETS

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Covid and market-based programming in IDP or refugee camp settings

Dec. 22, 2020, 5:21 p.m.

Isabelle Gore

I'm replying to this so that this interesting thread appears on the BEAM website conversation board.

June 12, 2020, 4:59 a.m.

Mary Morgan

So interesting Binod that transportation routes have shifted from land to water. Great that the boats were still around to be utilized to transport goods. Who would have thunk! Thanks for sharing your experience.
cheers
mary

Mary Morgan
225-7575 Duncan Street
Powell River, BC V8A 5L1
Cell: 604-314-8376
Email: [Hidden email] <mailto:[Hidden email]>

June 11, 2020, 7:26 a.m.

Binod Koirala

Hi Mary, Solenne

· From the beginning of this year, Plan International has been implementing a food security project that is providing unconditional cash grants in 6 camps in Myanmar. The project will continue at least until end of December this year.

· In April, we did a detail feasibility study in the camp-markets and found that most of the markets were functional. Majority of them were able to meet the local demands. Further, it was also interesting to see how the ‘established informal supply chain’ works despite a movement-restrictions for the local vendors and the local population (the restriction is not due to COVID-19 situation).

· At the moment-in addition to continue providing our cash grants, we are also carefully monitoring those markets. Our analysis shows they are still functioning. Access to food commodities has remains relatively stable. Some 3% price increase was noted for rice between April and May. Oil was temporarily scarce due to some restrictions on imports. Myanmar produces high quality sesame and groundnut oil which is expensive and therefore, relies on Indonesia and Malaysia for the oil that the majority of local people can afford.

· The interesting market adaptation that we have noted is the increased use of waterway for the supplies from other regions, including Yangon and Mandalay, which used to be the ‘surface route’ traditionally.

Binod Koirala
CVA Specialist, Plan International HQ

June 11, 2020, 5:38 a.m.

Mary Morgan

Hi Solenne
I think your observation that camps have established information sharing mechanisms is spot on. The fear of the virus spreading like wild fire through the overpopulated camps has motivated camp managers to do serious public health education. In Liberia, the president wrote and produced a song about beating covid, the UN also contracted an artist in Nigeria to write a song that is being used to educate people. Multi mediums are required for education in rural and remote areas. Again who is going to pay for the design, development and distribution of the messaging- wealthy NGOs can spread their materials around countries they work in, small NGOs are hooped but maybe they can advocate and lobby municipal and provincial/state government officials for some assistance.

Market linkages with suppliers and consumers is definitely the issue. The strategies you are following with new social media channels to contact new customers and also facilitating group formation so that businesses can negotiate with their supplies collectively and safely in the camps. I would love to hear if these leverage points increase market participation. ACDI/VOCA has written a paper on 5 Strategies to Revive Food and Agriculture Systems During COVID 19 <http: 05="" 2020="" five-market-systems-strategies-to-revive-food-agricultural-systems-during-covid-19="" www.acdivoca.org="">. This was shared in an earlier post, you may find somethings relevant to your context which will augment your current initiatives.

Whether the markets are thin or robust, lockdown is hitting all economies. Canada’s economy is expected to contract 9% for this year. Your work with facilitating linkages with suppliers will certainly benefit the reopening stage and yes, the markets will recover quickly with access to supply- the question is will camp residents have the money to purchase what they need.

best
Mary

Mary Morgan
225-7575 Duncan Street
Powell River, BC V8A 5L1
Cell: 604-314-8376
Email: [Hidden email] <mailto:[Hidden email]>

June 10, 2020, 9:36 a.m.

Solenne Delga

Thanks, Mary, for sharing this interesting example of market adaptations in camp settings. The story raised an essential point about access to information. Are camp populations better informed of COVID effects – and as a result better equipped to adapt – because they can rely on existing, well-established information sharing mechanisms that are not as robust in rural, and particularly, urban contexts? Is this assumption verified in the contexts you are working in? If so, how can humanitarian actors leverage these existing networks to support market functionality?

In IDP camps in Myanmar, DRC is seeing that small businesses are struggling to maintain market linkages (with both their suppliers and consumers) because of movement restrictions. DRC is currently providing business coaching services to help these businesses devise strategies to reach their pre-existing clientele, while developing different marketing strategies (including alternative communication channels such as social media) to attract new clients. We also help the businesses organize into groups to negotiate more effectively with suppliers to continue delivering raw materials to the camps in a safe manner. We do not yet have evidence of impact of such approaches, and we will continue monitoring the options for DRC to empower local actors to provide timely and relevant market information and other business support services themselves, but this is one possible example of market support in camps in times of COVID.

One last thought about possibly unique opportunities in camps. In most camp settings, markets are very thin, which means that lockdown measures and movement restrictions can virtually bring them to a complete stop. While it means short-term impacts are very severe, is the flipside of the coin that camp markets will likely recover more quickly? Food for thought.

All the best,
Solenne

Solenne Delga
Global Advisor, Economic Recovery – Livelihoods Lead
Programme Division

[Hidden email] <mailto:[Hidden email]>
Skype: solenne.delga

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Danish Refugee Council
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DK-1300 Kbh K
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Tel: +33 6 70 06 09 87
drc.ngo

June 10, 2020, 5:50 a.m.

Mary Morgan

Very interesting topic- camps and markets. This article <https: 2020="" 4="" 5e84a3584="" news="" stories="" syrian-refugees-adapt-life-under-coronavirus-lockdown-jordan-camps.html="" www.unhcr.org=""> shares what is happening in Jordan in a Syrian refugee camp. Through messaging and education from the UNHCR about the virus, people are staying home. The camp is also well supplied with food, with six centres distributing three kilograms of bread per family each day, while supermarkets and small fruit and vegetable stores remain open. Residents have even come up with their own method for maintaining social distancing in food queues, painting red circles on the ground 1.5 metres apart. Women entrepreneurs are making soap and distributing for free.

Mary Morgan
225-7575 Duncan Street
Powell River, BC V8A 5L1
Cell: 604-314-8376
Email: [Hidden email] <mailto:[Hidden email]>

June 9, 2020, 4:42 p.m.

[Hidden email]

Hi all,

Yet more intriguing discussions. Thanks all for the invaluable contributions!

Bearing in mind the rightful emphasis on context, I'd be really interested to hear from others on the specifics of designing market-based programmes in #CAMPMARKETS. Though there are many parallels with urban and other settings, in terms of the measures adopted to limit the spread of COVID-19, their impacts on people of concern and the markets upon which they rely and, critically, subsequent responses by diverse market actors, DRC's analysis to date has drawn out certain factors that are either unique to or, at least, more acute in IDP or refugee camp settings.

To name just one, a number of camps where DRC works have been subject to the very strictest forms of movement restriction, particularly with respect to camp residents and others entering and exiting the camp. Though circulation within camps is permitted in certain circumstances, especially those that have not yet experienced cases of COVID-19, the limits on entry/exit render people increasingly, if not entirely, dependent on in situ markets. Prior to the emergence of COVID-19, such markets ranged from the non-existent to the fully-fledged, with the majority residing somewhere in between. However, even the most sophisticated camp markets are now showing signs of deteriorating functionality, due both to the full or partial restrictions on camp entry and broader supply-side restrictions induced by COVID-19, with profound negative effects on camp residents.

It was interesting, even inspiring, to hear of the various ways diverse market actors are adapting the so-called "new normal" as part of last week's discussion. However, our analysis has also led me to question the extent to which these or other adaptations, regardless of effort or ingenuity, are as feasible in camp settings, given the limitations all too frequently imposed. This is as much in respect of individuals or households developing alternative means to produce their own food or earn money to purchase goods and services, as it is of camp market actors intent on adapting either the types of product/service on offer or the ways in which these are supplied. This is not to mention the concurrent limits on our own access and response options!

So many other complexities to explore, but I felt these worth raising as they will likely prove critical if we're to design feasible and effective responses! With all this in mind:

Does your experience to date support or refute this analysis, in terms of COVID-19 effects and adaptive responses in #CAMPMARKETS?
What other challenges and opportunities unique to or more acute in #CAMPMARKETS do you think should be considered when designing market-based programmes in response to COVID-19?
Lastly, does anyone have examples of ongoing or planned #CAMPMARKETS support and facilitation interventions, with an emphasis on those that are NOT cash/voucher-based?

Looking forward to hearing from you!

Cheers,

Ed

Edward Fraser
Global Advisor Economic Recovery - CVA Lead
Programme Division

[Hidden email] <mailto:edward.fraser@drc.ngo>
Dir.: +44(0)7941550901

[cid:image001.png@01D63E84.7D7C6D80]
drc.ngo</mailto:edward.fraser@drc.ngo>

June 9, 2020, 4:10 p.m.

[Hidden email]

Hi all,

Yet more intriguing discussions. Thanks all for the invaluable contributions!

Bearing in mind the rightful emphasis on context, I'd be really interested to hear from others on the specifics of designing market-based programmes in #CAMPMARKETS. Though there are many parallels with urban and other settings, in terms of the measures adopted to limit the spread of COVID-19, their impacts on people of concern and the markets upon which they rely and, critically, subsequent responses by diverse market actors, DRC's analysis to date has drawn out certain factors that are either unique to or, at least, more acute in IDP or refugee camp settings.

To name just one, a number of camps where DRC works have been subject to the very strictest forms of movement restriction, particularly with respect to camp residents and others entering and exiting the camp. Though circulation within camps is permitted in certain circumstances, especially those that have not yet experienced cases of COVID-19, the limits on entry/exit render people increasingly, if not entirely, dependent on in situ markets. Prior to the emergence of COVID-19, such markets ranged from the non-existent to the fully-fledged, with the majority residing somewhere in between. However, even the most sophisticated camp markets are now showing signs of deteriorating functionality, due both to the full or partial restrictions on camp entry and broader supply-side restrictions induced by COVID-19, with profound negative effects on camp residents.

It was interesting, even inspiring, to hear of the various ways diverse market actors are adapting the so-called "new normal" as part of last week's discussion. However, our analysis has also led me to question the extent to which these or other adaptations, regardless of effort or ingenuity, are as feasible in camp settings, given the limitations all too frequently imposed. This is as much in respect of individuals or households developing alternative means to produce their own food or earn money to purchase goods and services, as it is of camp market actors intent on adapting either the types of product/service on offer or the ways in which these are supplied. This is not to mention the concurrent limits on our own access and response options!

So many other complexities to explore, but I felt these worth raising as they will likely prove critical if we're to design feasible and effective responses! With all this in mind:

Does your experience to date support or refute this analysis, in terms of COVID-19 effects and adaptive responses in #CAMPMARKETS?
What other challenges and opportunities unique to or more acute in #CAMPMARKETS do you think should be considered when designing market-based programmes in response to COVID-19?
Lastly, does anyone have examples of ongoing or planned #CAMPMARKETS support and facilitation interventions, with an emphasis on those that are NOT cash/voucher-based?

Looking forward to hearing from you!

Cheers,

Ed

Edward Fraser
Global Advisor Economic Recovery - CVA Lead
Programme Division

[Hidden email] <mailto:edward.fraser@drc.ngo>
Dir.: +44(0)7941550901

[cid:image001.png@01D63E80.851BDCA0]
drc.ngo</mailto:edward.fraser@drc.ngo>